• COVID-19
  • Allergies and Infant Formula
  • Pharmacology
  • Telemedicine
  • Drug Pipeline News
  • Influenza
  • Allergy, Immunology, and ENT
  • Autism
  • Cardiology
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious disease
  • Nutrition
  • Neurology
  • Obstetrics-Gynecology & Women's Health
  • Developmental/Behavioral Disorders
  • Practice Improvement
  • Gynecology
  • Respiratory
  • Dermatology
  • Diabetes
  • Mental Health
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry
  • Animal Allergies
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sexual Health
  • Pain

It's not your average headache - especially if it's migraine

Article

Headaches are a significant pediatric problem - and pediatricians who don't recognize and treat them aren't doing their job, according to a Stanford University researcher who spoke at the AAP 2004 National Conference and Exhibition Saturday.

Headaches are a significant pediatric problem - and pediatricians who don't recognize and treat them aren't doing their job, according to a Stanford University researcher who spoke at the AAP 2004 National Conference and Exhibition Saturday.

"There are lots of kids with headaches out there," cautioned Paul Graham Fisher, M.D., FAAP, of the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, yesterday. "If you think you're not seeing them in your practice, you need to take another look!"

By the age of 7 years, he noted, 30% to 40% of children have experienced headache at least once. Between 2% and 3% have experienced at least one migraine. By age 15, 75% of children know headaches from personal experience. Ten percent have had at least one migraine episode.

Clinicians should consider headaches early, Dr. Fisher said: That means treat early and always consider triptans as first-line treatment when migraine is present.

"Start with the fundamentals," he advised. "Migraine is a pediatric disorder. Most adult migraines begin in childhood. If you manage your patients' headaches, you will be doing them and their parents a real favor."

Related Videos
Scott Ceresnak, MD
Importance of maternal influenza vaccination recommendations
Reducing HIV reservoirs in neonates with very early antiretroviral therapy | Deborah Persaud, MD
Samantha Olson, MPH
Deborah Persaud, MD
Ari Brown, MD, FAAP | Pediatrician and CEO of 411 Pediatrics; author, baby411 book series; chief medical advisor, Kabrita USA.
Steven Selbst, MD
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.