AAP issues advice on screening teens for STIs

July 17, 2014

New screening recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics aim to protect adolescents and young adults from nonviral sexually transmitted infections and their sequelae by promoting early diagnosis and treatment.

 

New screening recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) aim to protect adolescents and young adults from nonviral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and their sequelae by promoting early diagnosis and treatment. Teenagers and young adults are at higher risk of STIs than other age groups.

The AAP policy statement, based on published clinical guidance from federal agencies and professional medical organizations, offers guidelines for chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, and syphilis.

The AAP recommends annual screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for all sexually active female adolescents and young adults aged younger than 25 years and all adolescent and young adult males who have sex with males (MSM). Males who have sex with males with high-risk factors-multiple or anonymous partners, sex with illicit drug use, or partners who participate in these activities-should be screened every 3 to 6 months.

Also consider yearly chlamydia screening of sexually active males in high-prevalence settings (jails or juvenile corrections facilities, national job training programs, sexually transmitted disease clinics, and high school clinics) and annual gonorrhea screening for young men who have individual and population-based risk factors.

Screen youth who have been exposed to chlamydia or gonorrhea in the past 60 days from an infected partner. Rescreen all infected adolescents 3 months after treatment even if they believe their sex partners have been treated.

The AAP doesn’t recommend routine screening of asymptomatic adolescents for Trichomonas vaginalis, except girls who have risk factors that may increase their chances of infection (new or multiple partners, history of STIs, sex in exchange for payment, or injecting drugs). Consider rescreening girls who have been treated for trichomoniasis 3 months after treatment, or whenever they come in for health care within the year.

Routine screening of nonpregnant, heterosexual adolescents for syphilis also isn’t recommended. All sexually active adolescent and young adult MSM should be screened annually, or every 3 to 6 months if they are at high risk. 


 

 

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