• COVID-19
  • Allergies and Infant Formula
  • Pharmacology
  • Telemedicine
  • Drug Pipeline News
  • Influenza
  • Allergy, Immunology, and ENT
  • Autism
  • Cardiology
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious disease
  • Nutrition
  • Neurology
  • Obstetrics-Gynecology & Women's Health
  • Developmental/Behavioral Disorders
  • Practice Improvement
  • Gynecology
  • Respiratory
  • Dermatology
  • Diabetes
  • Mental Health
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry
  • Animal Allergies
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sexual Health
  • Pain

AAP reaffirms HPV vaccine for girls

Article

The American Academy of Pediatrics has corrected false campaign statements made this week by Republican presidential candidates that the vaccine for human papillomavirus, administered to girls and young women to protect against cervical cancer, is dangerous and can cause mental retardation.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has corrected false campaign statements made this week by Republican presidential candidates that the vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), administered to girls and young women to protect against cervical cancer, is dangerous and can cause mental retardation.

In a statement issued by AAP president O. Marion Burton, MD, FAAP, the organization strongly asserts that there is no scientific validity to the candidates’ claims.

“The American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Academy of Family Physicians all recommend that girls receive HPV vaccine around age 11 or 12. That’s because this is the age at which the vaccine produces the best immune response in the body, and because it’s important to protect girls well before the onset of sexual activity,” says Burton. “This is a life-saving vaccine that can protect girls from cervical cancer.”

The AAP statement echoes a recent report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) that examined evidence of potential adverse effects for 6 vaccines, including for HPV.

The IOM panel concluded that often “the evidence was inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship” between a particular vaccine and a specific rare adverse event.

About 6 million people in the United States become infected with HPV annually, including adolescents, and 4,000 women die from cervical cancer.

Go back to the current issue of the eConsult.

Related Videos
Scott Ceresnak, MD
Importance of maternal influenza vaccination recommendations
Reducing HIV reservoirs in neonates with very early antiretroviral therapy | Deborah Persaud, MD
Samantha Olson, MPH
Deborah Persaud, MD
Ari Brown, MD, FAAP | Pediatrician and CEO of 411 Pediatrics; author, baby411 book series; chief medical advisor, Kabrita USA.
Steven Selbst, MD
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.