Deep venous thrombosis a concern in hospitalized children

November 25, 2008

Pediatric venous thromboembolic events may be an increasing concern in tertiary care hospitals, research suggests.

Pediatric venous thromboembolic events may be an increasing concern in tertiary care hospitals, research suggests.

At the 2008 Veith Symposium, investigators reported the incidence, risk factors, and level of prophylaxis in affected children and the treatment of deep venous thrombosis among hospitalized children within their tertiary-care referral system.

Their findings suggest that those presenting with deep venous thrombosis have had a prior deep venous thrombosis and/or thrombophilia, and lower extremity is involved. Children most at risk to develop this condition while in the hospital are those admitted with severe respiratory, oncologic, and infectious diseases who require a prolonged ICU and hospital stay, and who require central venous access during their management, according to the study findings.

The investigators recommend that these children should be considered candidates for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis.