First-ever guidelines for pediatric acne

August 13, 2013

Although acne vulgaris is one of the most common skin conditions among children and teenagers, no concrete guidelines have existed for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric acne . . . until now.

 

Although acne vulgaris is one of the most common skin conditions among children and teenagers, no concrete guidelines have existed for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric acne . . . until now.

The American Acne and Rosacea Society has developed-and the American Academy of Pediatrics has endorsed-the first detailed and evidenced-based recommendations for pediatric acne in an effort to standardize management across primary and specialty care practices. The panel of experts who developed the guidelines hopes the recommendations will lead to improved age-appropriate care for all children.

The creation of the guidelines is particularly important given that the condition is affecting increasingly younger children, a trend experts think may be linked to the earlier onset of puberty.

Developed by a panel of pediatric dermatologists, pediatricians, and dermatologists with expertise in acne management, the recommendations review 10 major topic areas and include treatment algorithms and specific guidelines for management of the condition in adolescent, preadolescent (occurring in children aged 7 to 12 years), mid-childhood (ages 1 to 7 years), infantile, and neonatal populations.

The treatment section reviews use of over-the-counter products, topical benzoyl peroxide, topical retinoids, topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics, hormonal therapy, and isotretinoin. The experts also address the psychosocial aspects and emotional effects of the condition, how to help teenagers and children stick with their treatment regimens, good cleansing practices, and facts versus fiction when it comes to diet.

The researchers point out that preadolescent acne is not usually cause for alarm. It typically involves the appearance of whiteheads and blackheads in the forehead, nose, and chin regions and not more serious inflammatory lesions. Scarring is rare.

While preadolescent acne is unlikely to be a sign of a hormonal abnormality, it may signal that more serious acne problems will ensue during the patient’s teenaged years. 

 

 

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