Global mobilization of pediatricians is under way, international pediatric leader tells AAP National Conference audience

October 8, 2005

Adenike Grange, MD, of Nigeria, president of the International Pediatric Association (IPA) and a professor of pediatrics at the College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria, addressed 2,000 attendees today at the AAP's National Conference and Exhibition (NCE) in Washington, D.C. Her focus? The challenges and opportunities of global child health, and how the IPA is working to mobilize its extensive global network of pediatricians for advocacy and programs in child health around the world. Targeted program areas include child health in Sub-Saharan Africa, childhood tuberculosis, children's environmental health, child health in a humanitarian emergency, essential medicine for children and universal immunization.

Adenike Grange, MD, of Nigeria, president of the International Pediatric Association (IPA) and a professor of pediatrics at the College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria, addressed 2,000 attendees today at the AAP's National Conference and Exhibition (NCE) in Washington, D.C. Her focus? The challenges and opportunities of global child health, and how the IPA is working to mobilize its extensive global network of pediatricians for advocacy and programs in child health around the world. Targeted program areas include child health in Sub-Saharan Africa, childhood tuberculosis, children's environmental health, child health in a humanitarian emergency, essential medicine for children and universal immunization.

The IPA has evolved from a group of European pediatricians who assembled for the First International Congress of Pediatrics in 1912 to a nongovernmental organization with a membership of National Pediatric Societies of 136 countries, 10 Regional Pediatric Societies representing all areas of the world, 11 International Pediatric Specialty Societies, and the International Pediatric Chairmen's Association.

The original purpose of the IPA was to foster relationships among the pediatricians of the world, promote education, and share information about child health. With the exception of periods corresponding to the two World Wars of the 20th century, the IPA has held International Congresses of Pediatrics every three years since 1910.