High cervical CA, low HPV vaccination, study shows

November 20, 2014

States with higher rates of cervical cancer (CA) have significantly lower rates of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to data presented at a conference of the American Association for Cancer Research.

 

States with higher rates of cervical cancer (CA) have significantly lower rates of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to data presented at a conference of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Researchers collected data on state HPV vaccination rates from the National Immunization Survey-Teen and information on state cancer rates from the United States Cancer Statistics database. They found that states with lower incidences of cervical cancer, such as Massachusetts (6 per 100,000 women), also had higher vaccination rates among adolescent girls (69%), whereas states with higher cervical cancer incidence, such as Missouri (10 per 100,000 women), had significantly lower vaccination rates (41% of teenaged girls).

Vaccination rates were lower in states with greater cervical cancer mortality, larger non-Hispanic black populations, and fewer high-income residents. More girls received all 3 doses of HPV vaccine in states where more adolescents had contact with the healthcare system.

Although the study didn’t establish a cause-and-effect relationship between HPV vaccination and cervical cancer rates, it does suggest that boosting vaccination rates could prevent many persons from developing cancer, the researchers say. In addition to cervical cancer, HPV infection increases the risk of vaginal and vulvar cancers, penile cancer, anal cancer, mouth and throat cancer, and genital warts.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that girls and boys receive the HPV vaccine series at age 11 or 12 years. The researchers emphasize that healthcare providers should advocate HPV vaccination to adolescents at every contact.


 

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