• Pharmacology
  • Allergy, Immunology, and ENT
  • Cardiology
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Neurology
  • OB/GYN
  • Practice Improvement
  • Gynecology
  • Respiratory
  • Dermatology
  • Mental, Behavioral and Development Health
  • Oncology
  • Rheumatology
  • Sexual Health
  • Pain

Mixing 2 injections controls blood glucose as well as injecting separately

Article

Mixing insulin detemir with aspart is equivalent to giving the 2 medications as separate injections in children with type 1 diabetes.

Mixing insulin detemir with aspart is equivalent to giving the 2 medications as separate injections in children with type 1 diabetes, according to research published online May 26 in Diabetes Care.

In this study, 14 children with type 1 diabetes were randomly assigned to receive either mixed insulin injections or separate insulin injections for the first 10 days; they then crossed over for the last 10 days. Patients underwent continuous glucose monitoring during the last 72 hours of the study. At the end of the study, patients had equivalent blood glucose levels regardless of how their insulin had been delivered (48-hour area under the curve [AUC], mixed insulins: 457±70 mmol•h/L; separate insulins: 469±112 mmol•h/L; P=.58), suggesting that combining insulins into 1 injection should be as effective at controlling blood glucose levels as injecting insulins separately.

Related Videos
Venous thromboembolism, Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and direct oral anticoagulants | Image credit: Contemporary Pediatrics
Jessica Peck, DNP, APRN, CPNP-PC, CNE, CNL, FAANP, FAAN
Sally Humphrey, DNP, APRN, CPNP-PC | Image Credit: Contemporary Pediatrics
Ashley Gyura, DNP, CPNP-PC | Image Credit: Children's Minnesota
Congenital heart disease and associated genetic red flags
Traci Gonzales, MSN, APRN, CPNP-PC
Donna Hallas, PhD, CPNP, PPCNP-BC, PMHS, FAANP, FAAN
Scott Ceresnak, MD
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.