News Update: Aluminum in parenteral nutrition linked to decrease in bone health

December 1, 2009

Neonatal exposure to aluminum from parenteral nutrition solutions may have adverse effects beyond neurotoxicity; aluminum exposure may also affect long-term bone health.

Neonatal exposure to aluminum from parenteral nutrition solutions may have adverse effects beyond neurotoxicity; aluminum exposure may also affect long-term bone health.

In a study published in the November 2009 issue of Pediatrics, researchers assessed the bone area and bone mineral content of the lumbar spine, hip, and whole body in patients aged 13 to 15 years who were born preterm and who received either standard or aluminum-depleted parenteral nutrition solutions during the neonatal period. Among the 59 children included in the study, those who received standard parenteral nutrition solution had lower lumbar spine bone mineral content, and those who were exposed to aluminum intakes >55 mcg/kg had a hip bone mineral content that was decreased by 7.6%.

The authors advised that further study of neonatal exposure to parenteral aluminum is needed, as reduced bone mass during adolescence is a potential risk factor for osteoporosis and hip fracture later in life.