OSA in early life has long-term consequences

May 26, 2008

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in very young children can predict adverse cardiovascular effects later in life, according to findings presented at the American Thoracic Society's 2008 International Conference in Toronto.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in very young children can predict adverse cardiovascular effects later in life, according to findings presented at the American Thoracic Society's 2008 International Conference in Toronto.

The investigators studied 70 children ages 12 to 26 months with OSA. Compared to matched control children, 46 children with OSA had significantly higher levels of N terminal pro B type natriuretic peptide and C reactive protein. These increased levels may indicate a need for cardiovascular assessment, the researchers stated.

In a seperate study presented at the Toronto conference, researchers found that pregnant mothers exposed to barns and farm milk may affect the T regulatory cells of their babies, which would give them a protective effect against allergies.

The farm exposure was studied in 18 farming mothers, who were compared with 59 non-farming mothers.