Study offers insight into C difficile infection

July 1, 2014

To enhance understanding of the association between infection with Clostridium difficile and disease caused by this bacterium, investigators conducted population-based C difficile infection (CDI) surveillance in children aged 1 to 17 years residing in 10 US geographic areas during a 1-year period.

 

To enhance understanding of the association between infection with Clostridium difficile and disease caused by this bacterium, investigators conducted population-based C difficile infection (CDI) surveillance in children aged 1 to 17 years residing in 10 US geographic areas during a 1-year period. The C difficile infection cases were defined by a C difficile-positive stool sample and, for each CDI case, investigators determined if the infection was related to healthcare-facility onset or was community associated (CA).

Of 944 identified CDI cases, 71% were CA. While CDI incidence was highest among 1-year-olds and children who were white, the proportion of cases associated with diarrhea (72%) or severe disease (8%) was similar across all age groups. Interviews with a convenience sample of parents of children with CDI showed that almost three quarters of the infected children had recent exposure to antibiotics, most often for ear, sinus, or upper respiratory tract infection (Wendt JM, et al. Pediatrics. 2014;133[4]:651-658).

(Pediatrics. 2013;131[1]:196-200)

MS FREEDMAN is a freelance medical editor and writer in New Jersey. DR BURKE, section editor for Journal Club, is chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Saint Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. He is a contributing editor for Contemporary Pediatrics. The editors have nothing to disclose in regard to affiliations with or financial interests in any organizations that may have an interest in any part of this article.