US infants lacking in vitamin D, study indicates

April 1, 2010

Infants in the United States still may not be getting enough vitamin D in their diet or daily environment, according to new findings.

Infants in the United States still may not be getting enough vitamin D in their diet or daily environment, according to new findings published online on March 22 in Pediatrics.

In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics doubled the recommended daily vitamin D intake from 200 IU/d to 400 IU/d. Study investigators assessed the percentage of infants who achieved this vitamin D recommendation at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 10.5 months, based on data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II performed from 2005 to 2007.

Oral vitamin D supplement use was found to be low regardless of whether infants consumed formula, breast milk, or a combination, with rates ranging from 1% to 13% depending on age.

Based on these results, the authors stated that healthcare providers should advise parents of infants who are breastfed or who consume less than 1 liter of infant formula per day to give their children oral supplements of vitamin D.