The value of readers' contributions to this publication

June 1, 2005

For every issue of Contemporary Pediatrics, the editorial staff and editorial board work to identify topics and authors that we think will provide useful information for you in daily practice. Surveys of pediatricians—conducted by the publisher and by independent organizations that track how well medical publications are read—demonstrate that our efforts across more than 20 years have, in great measure, succeeded.

For every issue of Contemporary Pediatrics, the editorial staff and editorial board work to identify topics and authors that we think will provide useful information for you in daily practice. Surveys of pediatricians-conducted by the publisher and by independent organizations that track how well medical publications are read-demonstrate that our efforts across more than 20 years have, in great measure, succeeded.

Month after month and year after year, however, some of the most widely read sections of Contemporary Pediatrics have been sustained by the self-propelled contributions of readers-and by this I mean more than letters to the editor that appear in Readers' Forum. Every year, for example, the magazine receives about 100 Clinical Tips from readers, of which several dozen are accepted and appear in the magazine and on its Web site. They offer good advice, including practical suggestions about promoting effective interactions with patients and parents; pointers on gaining the trust of, and cooperation from, wary toddlers; and ideas for managing a medical practice successfully. It turns out that your colleagues are eager to share what they've learned from experience: They recognize that solutions to some of the most challenging aspects of the medical care of children can't be found in a textbook.

Readers also enlighten each other by submitting interesting and informative case reports for Puzzler, a section that was the inspiration of superb diagnostician and consummate teacher Walter W. Tunnessen, MD. Through exploration of the details of perplexing presentations, Walter encouraged readers to teach each other to respect patients' signs and symptoms as clues in a mystery. Solving that mystery requires an understanding that, although a patient's presentation is affected by his (or her) unique physical environment, emotional and social situation, and genetic makeup, any individual also has something to teach us about the next patient we see. Since Walter's death in 2001, George K. Siberry, MD, MPH, has capably taken on the challenge of shaping cases submitted by readers-to ensure that they are as informative as possible and that the information is accurate.

A welcoming policy on submissions-to Puzzler, Clinical Tips, and Behavior: Ask the Experts-helps Contemporary Pediatrics maintain a dialogue, of sorts, with its readers. Your contributions remind us continually of the challenges of care that our readers face every day, but also highlight the gratification that's gained from meeting those challenges and sharing insights with colleagues.








At the front door, a warm welcome for your words The Contemporary Pediatrics Web site is the fastest conduit to the editors for many kinds of communication from readers. The links listed here all reside on the left-hand navigation bar of the home page. We're happy to hear from you.

Submitting a Clinical Tip?
Link through "Clinical Tips"

Querying about a potential Puzzler?
"E-mail the editor"

Have a problematic case for Behavior: Ask the Experts?
"Ask a behavior question"

Writing a letter for Readers' Forum?
"Send a letter"

Considering contributing a manuscript?
"Author guidelines"

Need to contact the Editor or Editor-in-Chief?
"E-mail the editor"