Web links: Toy safety info

July 1, 2007

These links offer information on types of toys, and toy safety standards.

No one wants to hurt kids. The makers of unsafe toys are not the slimycharacters parodied on late-night TV selling bags of broken glass andoily rags as playthings for kids. Inexpensive construction, materials not durableenough for long-time play, and basic carelessness are much more often theculprits. But the carelessness extends to the stores that put such toys on theshelves, and even the parents who purchase them without realizing thepotential for danger they face. An extra bit of care on your part could be thedifference between an enriching toy and a trip to the emergency department.

American Society for Testing AndMaterials:

http://www.astm.org.

Dr. Toy:

http://www.drtoy.com.

Stevanne Auerbach, PhD, the selfstyled“Dr. Toy,” has over 30 years ofexperience in designing andrecommending safe andeducational toys.

Entertainment Ratings SoftwareBoard:

http://www.ersb.org.

Find out what the ratings letter on avideo game means, and if a childshould play it or not.

Fireworks Safety:

http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/961791958.html.

Fireworks injuries are so infuriatingbecause all of them are unnecessary,and far too many happen to kids. Doyour part to keep your patients out ofthe burn ward.

Health Canada’s Toy Safety Tips:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/cons/toy_safe-jouet_secur_e.html.

International advice from Canada ontoy safety, in English and French.

The Juvenile ProductsManufacturer’s Association

http://www.jpma.org.

Everything’s a toy when the world isso new, and the JPMA’s strictstandards keep babies safe with caraseats, cribs, changing tables, highchairs, play yards, strollers, gates,baths, and walkers.