Abdominal migraine may be the cause of gastrointestinal upset

September 1, 2010

Children who have regular episodes of nausea and vomiting may suffer from abdominal migraine.

Children who have regular episodes of nausea and vomiting may suffer from abdominal migraine. Symptoms include recurring moderate to severe migraine-like pain in the middle of the abdomen that lasts up to three days, and may include vomiting and loss of appetite. Abdominal migraine is considered a migraine equivalent, as it does not typically involve head pain. Abdominal migraine is most common in children, but can also affect adolescents and adults.

According to David W Dodick, MD, of the Mayo Clinic, writing for the August 18 New York Times Consults blog, diagnosing patients with the condition is often difficult and involves the exclusion of other disorders, such as cyclic vomiting, another migraine equivalent. Treatment of abdominal migraine can include antimigraine medication, and sometimes, antinausea or antidiarrheal drugs.