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Pseudostrabismus (Pseudoesotropia)

Publication
Article
Consultant for PediatriciansConsultant for Pediatricians Vol 7 No 11
Volume 7
Issue 11

The parents of this 5-month-old boy were concerned that his eyes were turned in toward the nose. The infant was otherwise healthy. Physical examination findings were normal. In particular, when a light source was projected onto the eyes, the light reflex was centered in both eyes.

 

The parents of this 5-month-old boy were concerned that his eyes were turned in toward the nose. The infant was otherwise healthy. Physical examination findings were normal. In particular, when a light source was projected onto the eyes, the light reflex was centered in both eyes.

The child has pseudostrabismus (pseudoesotropia)- the false appearance of strabismus when, in fact, the eyes are orthotropic. The appearance may result from a flat and broad nasal bridge, prominent epicanthal folds, or a narrow interpupillary distance. The condition is more common in Asian children. With pseudostrabismus, the corneal light reflex is centered in both eyes and the alternate cover test shows no refixation movement. The converse is true for strabismus. The prognosis is excellent; most children with pseudostrabismus outgrow the condition.

 

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