Consultant for Pediatricians Vol 6 No 3

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Update on the Pros and Cons of Treatment Options

March 01, 2007

ABSTRACT: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy among females of reproductive age. In adolescents, PCOS often manifests with irregular menses, hirsutism, and acne. Despite general agreement that the metabolic derangements of PCOS arise during puberty, the condition is diagnosed more often in adults than in adolescents. Treatment is focused on weight loss, menstrual cycle regulation, and amelioration of physical symptoms. Acute symptoms can be managed with combination oral contraceptives and antiandrogens and potentially with insulin-sensitizing drugs. Lifestyle modification, especially in overweight patients, can reduce symptoms and help prevent long-term health consequences.

Photoclinic: Mycoplasma Infection

March 01, 2007

A scaly, erysipeloid rash had erupted in the axillae of an 8-year-old boy and spread to the buttocks and thighs within 2 days. The child complained only of pruritus. The rash had worsened despite treatment with clindamycin for 4 days.

Photoclinic: Halo Nevus

March 01, 2007

A 13-year-old girl noticed that the skin around a "mole" on her abdomen had gradually changed color. This patient was told that she had a halo nevus--a pigmented (nevocellular) nevus surrounded by a tight ring of depigmentation--which is benign and usually regresses spontaneously over time. This relatively common lesion is believed to affect males and females equally. The development of the halo may coincide with puberty or pregnancy. Often, several pigmented nevi develop a halo simultaneously.

Case in Point: Sandifer Syndrome

March 01, 2007

A previously healthy full-term, 30-week- old infant presents to the emergency department after a 30-minute episode in which he turned blue after a feeding. His mother states that the infant was also stiff, that he "arched his back," and that his eyes "had a blank look." There was no twitching associated with this episode, and the infant had no fever, cold symptoms, or any sick contact.

Top Papers Of The Month: Repeat Cultures in UTI?

March 01, 2007

Each year in this country, UTI is diagnosed and treated in numerouschildren younger than 18 years; some are hospitalized as a result.Affected children have positive urine cultures and are treated withantibiotics.