What might 2022 hold?

Contemporary PEDS Journal, January/February 2022, Volume 39, Issue 1

Editor-in-chief Tina Q. Tan, MD, FAAP, FIDSA, FPIDS reflects on what 2022 may hold and shares her must-read articles from the January/February issue.

It is hard to believe that 2022 (Chinese zodiac Year of the Tiger) has started. We begin the year, unfortunately, with COVID-19 still front and center of health care news. The Omicron variant has, as of this writing, spread to more than 110 countries, including here in the United States. This variant contains 30 mutations in the spike protein, which makes it highly transmissible and has been noted to be the most rapidly spreading of all the SARS-CoV-2 variants. The current COVID-19 vaccines provide some protection against this variant, although less than against the other variants. The risk for breakthrough infections and hospitalizations among those that are fully vaccinated is increased with the Omicron variant.

On a more promising note, ever since the US Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for children aged 5 to 11 years, an estimated 20% of those in this age group (as of this writing) have received at least 1 dose of the vaccine. Let’s hope this trend continues.

This month’s January/February issue packs a number of must-read articles:

  • The Pediatric Pharmacology section features an excellent piece on harmful pharmaceutical excipients (eg, protein stabilizers, solvents, preservatives). We don’t think about this problem very often, but some of these agents can cause adverse reactions in certain patients.
  • The Mental Health section offers a sobering look at the gun violence crisis, and particularly the dangers it presents for children in underserved areas. This includes commentary by Steven Selbst, MD, a member of the Contemporary Pediatrics® editorial board.
  • The Nutrition section’s article explores the reasons behind the poor eating habits of adolescents. It also provides some practical recommendations for ways to improve their food choices.
  • The Respiratory and Infections Diseases section discusses the crossover symptoms of COVID-19 and influenza, infections that everyone will be seeing in their practices. This piece was cowritten by Russell Libby, MD, also a member of the Contemporary Pediatrics® editorial board.

Thank you for providing outstanding care to your patients during these rapidly changing times. “Wishing you a Happy New Year! May it be filled with new adventures and good fortunes.” (Anonymous.)

Please stay safe and well. As always, I welcome your suggestions, comments, and questions.

With warm regards,

Tina Q. Tan