Diabetes guide for school personnel will also bolster your discussions with parents

September 13, 2006

The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation has produced a tool for school personnel, child-care providers, and others entrusted with the care of a child who has type-1 diabetes. "Facts about Diabetes: A guide for school personnel and child care providers" features information about the disease and how it is controlled; clear instructions on handling emergency situations, such as an insulin reaction; and a diabetes management form that can be personalized. The brochure can also be a useful prompt for you to talk with parents of a diabetic child during office visits about their school-day concerns.

The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation has produced a tool for school personnel, child-care providers, and others entrusted with the care of a child who has type-1 diabetes. "Facts about Diabetes: A guide for school personnel and child care providers" features information about the disease and how it is controlled; clear instructions on handling emergency situations, such as an insulin reaction; and a diabetes management form that can be personalized. The brochure can also be a useful prompt for you to talk with parents of a diabetic child during office visits about their school-day concerns.

According to the foundation, a general lack of information about type-1 diabetes leaves many people with misconceptions about the disease, which can result in a potentially life-threatening situation for a child at school. This leaves many parents fearful about leaving their diabetic child in the care of anyone but a trained professional who can immediately respond to a diabetes-related crisis.

Federal education law protects children with a disability against discrimination in public schools and in private schools that receive federal financial assistance, the foundation points out—and diabetes is defined as a disability by that law. This means that school personnel and day-care programs must take into account the needs of the child with diabetes—which include being aware of the child's health plan; assisting in the treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia; and allowing the child to test blood sugar, administer insulin, and eat whenever necessary.

"Facts about Diabetes" can be ordered through the foundation's Web site (www.diabetesresearch.org) or by calling (800) 321-3437.