Caffeine may raise adolescents' blood pressure—especially among African-Americans

July 1, 2004

In a recent study, adolescents who consumed a large amount of caffeine (more than 100 mg/day, the equivalent of almost four 12-ounce cans of cola soda) had a higher systolic BP than peers who consumed smaller amounts of caffeine.

In a recent study, adolescents who consumed a large amount of caffeine (more than 100 mg/day, the equivalent of almost four 12-ounce cans of cola soda) had a higher systolic BP than peers who consumed smaller amounts of caffeine. Among these high consumers of caffeine, African-American adolescents had, overall, a higher systolic BP reading than did white adolescents. All participants in the three-day study selected their own foods and beverages from an array of sodium-controlled choices. Caffeine also had a modest effect on diastolic BP among those who consumed a large amount of caffeine, but the effect was the same in both races (Savoca MR et al: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2004; 158:473).