CDC: Influenza season in 2007-2008 was moderately severe

April 21, 2008

According to interim results of a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2007-2008 influenza season was moderately severe, and two of three vaccine strains were not optimally matched with circulating viruses.

According to interim results of a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2007-2008 influenza season was moderately severe, and two out of three vaccine strains were not optimally matched with circulating viruses.

Published in the April 18 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the study also reported that vaccinated individuals were 44% less likely to contract influenza than those who were not.

Influenza has so far been responsible for 66 pediatric deaths this season, and of these, 52 children were not vaccinated, not fully vaccinated, or ineligible for vaccination. Pediatric deaths due to influenza during the last three seasons ranged from 46 to 74.

However, there was a record 140 million doses of flu vaccine produced by six companies, 113 million of which were distributed. The CDC now recommends that all healthy children ages 5 to 18 should be vaccinated, which will increase vaccine demand by up to 30 million children next season.