Lipid-lowering agent slows growth of kidney cysts

May 22, 2014

Pravastatin-commonly used to treat lipid disorders-slows the progression of structural kidney disease in children and young adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, according to the findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

 

Pravastatin-commonly used to treat lipid disorders-slows the progression of structural kidney disease in children and young adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), according to the findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine had 91 participants aged from 8 to 22 years complete a 3-year study. They found that 69% of those who received pravastatin versus 88% of those who received placebo reached the primary endpoint of a 20% or greater change in height-corrected total kidney volume, left ventricular mass index determined by magnetic resonance imaging, or urine microalbumin excretion.

According to the investigators, no serious side effects occurred. However, they reminded that pravastatin should not be used during pregnancy, and that the agent is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for ADPKD.

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was formerly referred to as “adult” PKD because symptoms often take a few decades to develop. The most common age of diagnosis is 30 to 40 years of age. However, experts now know that the condition can affect children and even fetuses. According to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, about 600,000 people in the United States have PKD, and about 90% of those have the autosomal dominant variety.

For those children affected, experts believe that the earlier in childhood treatment begins, the greater the effect on long-term progression of the disease. 


 

 

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