Magnetoencephalography scans and autism

April 1, 2014

Among the most vexing challenges of autism is its very diagnosis.

 

Roberto Fernández Galán, PhDAmong the most vexing challenges of autism is its very diagnosis. Roberto Fernández Galán, PhD, and colleagues at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, have completed a promising pilot trial that revealed that when scanned using magnetoencephalography (MEG), the brains of children with autism produce more information-even in the absence of external stimuli-than their nonautistic peers. Watch Dr. Galán describe how this discovery of “the noisy brain” could be the elusive noninvasive biomarker that may result in earlier identification and care for these special children.

 

Pérez Velázquez JL, Galán RF. Information gain in the brain's resting state: a new perspective on autism. Front Neuroinform. 2013;7:37.