Sleep Quality Linked to Hypertension in Healthy Teens

August 18, 2008

Healthy adolescents with poor quality of sleep are more likely to have prehypertension, according to research published online Aug. 18 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

MONDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy adolescents with poor quality of sleep are more likely to have prehypertension, according to research published online Aug. 18 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Sogol Javaheri, and colleagues from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, examined blood pressure and sleep patterns by in-home wrist actigraphy and at a sleep center in 238 healthy adolescents (average age 13.7 years).

The researchers found that 14 percent of children had prehypertension (90th percentile or greater for age, sex and height), 26 percent had low sleep efficiency and 11 percent had low sleep duration. After adjustment for a number of factors, prehypertension was more common in adolescents with low sleep efficiency (odds ratio 3.5) and short sleep (odds ratio 2.5), the report indicates. Systolic blood pressure was an average of 4 mm Hg higher in adolescents with low sleep efficiency, the authors note.

"Poor sleep quality is associated with prehypertension in healthy adolescents," Javaheri and colleagues conclude. "Our data suggest that low sleep efficiency may be associated more consistently with prehypertension than short sleep duration."

The authors report a financial relationship with medical equipment companies.

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