What’s causing nonfatal TBIs in kids?

August 15, 2019
Miranda Hester

Ms. Hester is Content Specialist with Contemporary OB/GYN and Contemporary Pediatrics.

Home furnishings, toys, home electronics, and other consumer products may be responsible for the nonfatal pediatric traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) that send children aged 0 to 19 years to the emergency department, according to a recent study.

Home furnishings, toys, home electronics, and other consumer products may be responsible for the nonfatal pediatric traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) that send children aged 0 to 19 years to the emergency department (ED), according to a new study published in Brain Injury.

The researchers looked at data for 2010 to 2013 from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program and product information from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. They found 4.1 million nonfatal TBI-related ED visits during this period. When divided into age ranges, there were 380,842 TBIs in infants aged younger than 1 year; 1,085,680 in children aged 1 to 4 years; 682,826 in children aged 5 to 9 years; 834,565 in children aged 10 to 14 years; and 1,107,463 in children aged 15 to 19 years.

Study data showed that home furnishings and fixtures, particularly beds, were the main cause of nonfatal TBIs for infants aged <1 year and children aged 1 to 4 years. For the other age ranges, 5 to 9 years, 10 to 14 years, and 15 to 19 years, TBIs related to sports and recreation, particularly bicycles and football, were prevalent. Other products linked to TBIs included personal use items, items for hobbies, construction materials, and home structures, such as the floor.

 

The researchers concluded that the research indicates areas where TBIs could be prevented, such as securing home furnishings and removing potential tripping hazards.