Addressing atypical anorexia: Part 1

Contemporary Pediatrics sat down with Dr. Erin Harrop, an assistant professor at University of Denver in Colorado and a licensed medical social worker to talk about atypical anorexia nervosa, including diagnostic challenges.

When thinking about anorexia nervosa, it's likely that you'll picture a very thin adolescent girl staring at a scale or maybe a plate with only a small amount of food. This image does describe some suffering from the disease, but it can happen to anyone, even people who are considered overweight, which can make diagnosis difficult.

Welcome to the first episode in a series where Contemporary Pediatrics sat down with Dr. Erin Harrop, an assistant professor at University of Denver in Colorado and a licensed medical social worker to talk about atypical anorexia, which is when a patient with anorexia has a BMI that is more than mildly severe low body weight. In this episode, Dr. Harrop discusses diagnosing atypical anorexia; how the declaration of the obesity epidemic and fat bias can make diagnosis difficult; and how the resolutions of the New Year can be a tricky time.

For episode 2 in the series, click here, and for episode 3, click here.