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Distract ToddlersWith DummyBandages

Publication
Article
Consultant for PediatriciansConsultant for Pediatricians Vol 8 No 7
Volume 8
Issue 7

When I repair facial lacerations on toddlers, I find that they are likely to start pulling at the bandage as soon as I put it on.

When I repair facial lacerations on toddlers, I find that they are likely to start pulling at the bandage as soon as I put it on. This endangers the repair and increases the risk of infection. An effective solution is to put a colorful children’s adhesive bandage on each of the patient’s thumbs. This gives the child something new to focus on and distracts him or her from the facial bandage. The thumb bandages are more difficult to pull off, thus giving the face more time to heal.

- Jean-Paul Romes, MD
Pittsburgh

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