What’s in a name?

February 1, 2014

I have been an avid reader of Contemporary Pediatrics for years and have always found the articles timely and relevant to a practicing pediatrician like myself. There is one aspect of your publication that bothers me, however, and that is not consistent with your mission statement, which is, to present practical information to office-based pediatricians.

 

I have been an avid reader of Contemporary Pediatrics for years and have always found the articles timely and relevant to a practicing pediatrician like myself. There is one aspect of your publication that bothers me, however, and that is not consistent with your mission statement, which is, to present practical information to office-based pediatricians.

I am referring to the persistent use of only generic names for medications discussed in your articles. Practically, we don’t refer to omeprazole or lansoprazole but in reality use Prilosec or Prevacid. The same is true of fluticasone and budesonide instead of Veramyst or Pulmicort.

This may not satisfy the ivory tower academicians, but in practice we use brand names, as do our patients. It is quite annoying to have to read an article while having to employ another reference to translate the names of the drugs. Would the use of the brand name in parenthesis next to the generic name offend someone's academic sensibilities?

I am the medical director of a 26-practitioner general pediatric practice, and all my colleagues feel the same way. It would make a great journal even better if you could effect that change

David Wisotsky, MD

CEO, Medical Director

Tenafly Pediatrics PA

Tenafly, New Jersey

 

Editor’s note:Contemporary Pediatrics agrees with Dr. Wisotsky’s suggestion and in the future will use both the brand names and generic names of medications in its articles. Thank you, readers, and know that we are listening to your suggestions to make this journal better.