Secondhand smoke exposure during infancy increases child infection risk

May 30, 2008

Household secondhand smoke exposure during infancy increases the risk of severe infection during childhood, according to the May 27 online Tobacco Control.

Household exposure to secondhand smoke during infancy increases the risk of infection-related hospital admission during childhood, according to the May 27 online Tobacco Control.

Researchers studied secondhand smoke exposure's impact on serious infectious morbidity during the first 8 years of life in 7,402 children. Household exposure to secondhand smoke within three meters was linked to a significant increase risk of hospital admission for infectious diseases up until age 8. This association was strongest in the first six months of life.

Among preemies and other vulnerable subgroups exposed to secondhand smoke, the risk of later hospital admission for infectious illnesses was greatest during the first three months of life.