Study: ADHD looks the same the world over

January 24, 2008

A long-term study of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) found that the disorder?s long-term effects appear regardless of treatment...

A long-term study of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) found that the disorder’s long-term effects appear regardless of treatment.

The longitudinal study, which was begun in Finland in 1986 by UCLA researchers, was recently published in the Journal of the American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. It tracked 10,000 children through adolescence.

The study found an 8.5% prevalence rate of ADHD, regardless of region or treatment. It also found that only half of the children diagnosed with ADHD showed cognitive defects, and that many ADHD-diagnosed children with cognitive defects did not have increased levels of inattention or hyperactivity.

ADHD drugs show effectiveness in the short term, researchers stated, but note the similarity in the treatment and non-treatment groups for long-term effects.